Week of July 2

Encountering Jesus

Truth AND Grace

Day 1: When Jesus encountered the adulterous woman, we see His heart for the sinner – namely, us. There is an internal shame button that can get triggered any time we get ‘caught’ or ‘found out’ in our sin. But like Romans 3 states: “There is no one that is righteous…not even one.” When was the last time you were aware of your sin? Have you acknowledged your sin before God today? What about yesterday? Consider your thoughts, attitudes and actions. Read John 8:1-11 and notice any habits (or symptoms) that reveal sin in yourself. In doing so, you will see your own need for truth and grace. 

 

Day 2: Surrounding the adulterous woman, we find a group of people who were her accusers. These people, the Pharisees, no doubt had a solid sense of right and wrong. They followed the Bible and the teachings within. They were looking to hold others accountable for what they knew to be true. What do you think about the need for telling the truth to someone? The Pharisees wanted to debate and outsmart Jesus. Isn’t it remarkable how they used a human being in an attempt to win an argument? Reflect on your own heart and intentions. Can you recall a time recently when you needed to be a truth-teller to be right rather than to love a person? What stirs in the hearts of us to judge in this way? 

 

Day 3: Recall the devotional from yesterday. Did you remember an instance where you told someone the truth in order to prove that you were right? Maybe it was just an internal dialogue in your mind or you shared these thoughts with someone else. Now consider the person. Picture him/her. What gifts and strengths does this person possess? Describe their personality. How would you say that God would describe this person? In light of viewing someone from Jesus’ eyes, what ‘truth’ do they need to hear? Take the rest of the week to pray for this person. 

 

Day 4: In Cory’s message, he asks this question: Is there someone in your life to whom you need to extend grace by offering forgiveness, seeking to understand their struggle, or in sharing their burden even if it doesn’t seem fair? The nature of grace rests firmly on the reality that it is not fair. Consider this: What in me demands that others need to “pay their dues”? Is this Jesus’ example of grace and mercy? Do I have the same measurement of fair and right when it comes to people who are completely unlike me (that I don’t like or maybe agree with) as I do of my own children, people I love, or even myself? Notice Jesus’ response to the woman, “Neither do I condemn you.” There is quite a difference between bringing people to Jesus vs. bringing people before Him. In your own words, how would you describe the difference? 

 

Day 5: Go back to day 1. Literally. Reflect and remember the grace you have received. Have you been judged by Jesus or have you received forgiveness for your sin? This question has significant ramifications. Feeling judged by Jesus pulls us into the world of rules and judgment. When we see ourselves in this light, it is only natural to view others through a similar lens. Do I look around for those who are violating the rules? In John 8, as the Pharisees ruled with judgment, Jesus simply loved this woman. Looking at her, he said, “Neither do I condemn you” offering her acceptance despite her past. Then speaking love and hope to her, He said, “Go and sin no more.” Jesus didn’t point to her to the past but to the future. What sin do you need to confess and accept Jesus’ forgiveness? What is He calling you to step away from or to move closer towards?

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