Week of April 22

Reactions to the Resurrection

Brokenness

Day 1: We’ve all blown it before; it’s a universal experience. Peter blew it, so did Judas, and to some extent their story is our story. If you just thought, “I would never…,” remember that’s how Peter’s failure began! Judas had hoped for a different kind of Messiah and King, but he was disappointed. Peter was afraid. In pivotal circumstances, neither one of them could get past their fear or disappointment. They left their Shepherd. What has led you astray this week? What emotion, attitude, or desire when combined with a difficult circumstance has taken you where you didn’t want to go? Disappointment? Fear? Anger? Frustration? Pride? Anxiety? Instead of hoping or praying not to have those emotions, attitudes, and beliefs, what would it be like to ask God to help you with them and to discover where they come from?  

 Day 2: If you have blown it, now what? How you respond may be as important as the sin committed. Judas stepped away from community and isolated himself. He responded in hopelessness; he ended his life. In the same way, Peter was distraught. We don’t know the guilt he may have been hiding or the prayers he may have prayed. Despite guilt, anguish, embarrassment and shame, Peter chose to stay in community. With that choice and humility, Peter put himself in a place to be reconciled to Jesus. Read Luke 15:11-32. As you read, put Peter in the place of the younger son. Then put yourself in the younger son’s shoes. In this parable Jesus is saying, “This is our Father!” In the same way, that is how Jesus was with Peter and how He is with us. This sacrificial love and forgiveness is available to us thru Jesus. Is there an old sin or failure that has created one of the emotions, attitudes, or beliefs you identified in Day 1? Can you take a step and voice your sorrow or guilt to the Father? Do you need to voice it to someone you have community with, or risk an apology to someone who was hurt by your failure?  

Day 3: “Come as you are” is Jesus’ invitation to us. Not come as you want to be or think you should be but as you are right now. “As I am.” That is powerful to take in. We don’t like being weak, broken, poor, or vulnerable. Culture and our selfishness whisper for us to go and hide. Read Matt. 5:3-10 and 2 Cor. 12:8-10. Jesus says there is beauty in our weakness, poverty, meekness. He says that those who embrace these qualities will receive his Kingdom. Peter ran (or swam) toward Jesus just as the younger son ran to the Father in yesterday’s reading. He has seen Jesus forgive others, heard the parables, and built enough trust in Jesus to run to him. What would running to Jesus look like for us now? Imagine a child approaching a parent in sorrow, does the parent need to hear much before they bend down, hug and forgive the child? How much more so with our Heavenly Father. Reflect on this picture with your Heavenly Father.  

Day 4: Read Rev. 3:20.You may have heard this verse used evangelistically, but in this verse Jesus is talking to his followers who have lost their way, inviting them back. He is with you, no matter how guilty and hopeless you feel, Jesus is there, actively offering forgiveness and ongoing relationship. Read John 21: 15-17.Jesus meets Peter where he is. With three stinging denials burned into his head and heart, Jesus provides him a way to confront each denial with an affirmation of following and love. Forgiving Peter, or forgiving us, is not some legal transaction, or an eraser from a sin ledger. Forgiveness is always a desired act of sacrificial love on Jesus’ part. Forgiveness is about relationship. How do you picture or understand Jesus’ forgiveness towards you? Disgruntled, forced, put out or bothered by? Is there something in Peter’s story of forgiveness that needs to become a part of your story?  

Day 5: A living, resurrected Jesus forgave Peter and changed his life. He offered Peter another chance. Jesus didn’t just forgive him, he called him back into life. A life of purpose, meaning, significance, and following. How are you living out forgiveness? Have you experienced forgiveness from God lately? Consider the last time, mustering courage, you turned toward God and admitted a sinful attitude in your heart? If something comes to mind, how did forgiveness affect your heart, your relationship with the Father? But what if you don’t recall the last time you asked for forgiveness? Why do you think that is the case? Luke 7:47 “Therefore, I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven—as her great love has shown. But whoever has been forgiven little loves little.”

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