Week of August 19

DNA: We Were Made For This

Luke 19:1-10. Story of Zacchaeus

Day 1. Imagine that it’s November 3, 2015, and you are in the crowded streets of downtown Kansas City. You know that sometime soon, the crowd will erupt as fans strain to get glimpses of the World Series Champions Kansas City Royals. But as you work the crowd vying for a spot, you recognize that from any position you find, you still can’t see. So, what do you do? Well, you climb up the stoplight pole, of course, just for a chance to see the team whose greatness everyone has seen and heard about. Now, read Luke 19:1-5. There were probably less than 800,000 people in Jericho the day that Jesus arrived, but the crowd that followed Him was large enough – and apparently tall enough – that Zacchaeus simply could not see. Jesus’ reputation preceded Him wherever He went, and in each city, the people clamored to get an opportunity to hear Him teach, to be healed, to experience Him personally. Consider today what a privilege we have to be able to know Jesus through the Bible and through the Holy Spirit.  

Day 2. Read Luke 19:1-6. What do we know about Zacchaeus? Imagine that the guy on the stoplight pole (see yesterday’s reading) was the head of the regional IRS office and was exploiting the taxpayers for personal gain. That was Zacchaeus. He was not just a “wee little man” as the familiar song goes. He was a wealthy, powerful, and greatly disliked man. Why do you think a man in his position was so determined to see Jesus? Maybe he just wanted an opportunity to experience the presence of this man that everyone was talking about. Or perhaps, despite all that he had gained, he knew that there was something that he still lacked. Either way, when Jesus called to him, Zacchaeus made a choice to respond. He invited Jesus into His home. Read verses 8-10. We don’t know what Jesus said to Zacchaeus in their time together, but we do know that it resulted in a changed perspective. Zacchaeus acknowledged his exploits and vowed to make it right! If Jesus was sitting at your dinner table, what things might you want to change or make right? Pray about it. Acknowledge it and declare it to Jesus.  

Day 3. Read Luke 19:5. Despite the crowds gathered around Him, Jesus chose to look up and acknowledge the despised tax guy in the tree. Jesus called him by name! He was aware of Zacchaeus and chose to pursue him. Throughout the course of Jesus’ life, He was continually looking up to take note of those around Him.  He chose to engage, to forgive, to love, and to save those who knew theywere lost.This is the heart of Jesus. It was how He lived and who He was. It’s also how He invites us to live. As we seek to know and become like Jesus, consider the ways that you can be aware of those around you. How well do you know the people you live your life among? Have you considered inviting your neighbors or co-workers into your home for a meal? What steps can you take to create margin in your life, so that you can have the space to look up and notice? 

Day 4 Read Luke 19:9-10. What does Jesus say is His ultimate purpose? He came to seek and save the lost. This is His pursuit of us. As He looked up toward Zacchaeus, Jesus is looking up at you as well.  He sees you and knows you completely. He sees through your religion. He sees beyond your sinful past - your failures, cheating, and facade - and He loves you. To be like Jesus is to reflect Him, and to follow Him means we choose every day to respond to know Him and to become like Him. Jesus spoke truth to Zacchaeus and His words stirred Zacchaeus to make a change! What truth is Jesus speaking to you? What change is he calling you to pursue? Do you hear Him?  

Day 5. Read Luke 19:7. What does this verse say to us about the crowd? What was their perception of Zacchaeus? How did they feel about Jesus’ decision to dine with a sinner? How often are we more like the crowd than we are like Jesus? Make it personal. Do I see those around me as sinners and pass judgement on them? Or do I see them with compassion? Who am I more like? When we read the gospel accounts of Jesus’ life, we see that He not only healed the lame, comforted the grief-stricken, and fed the hungry. He also had compassion on the politician, the tax collector, and the prostitute. Are we living like Jesus? Do we care for the soul of the person as Jesus did? Consider the people you’ve encountered in your life today. Is there anyone you’ve clearly judged or disregarded as “too far gone”? 

As you go about your day today, be aware and look up to see those around you. We just may find that we don’t know how we can be like Jesus to them. Let that turn into your prayer.

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